Newham

Newham's Youth Council set to wow judges at Sundance London Film Festival

29 February 2012 in Young Mayor and Young people

Renowned film maker Danny Boyle gave the thumbs up to the borough’s budding movie makers when they met him to discuss the creative process, for their film “A day in the life”. Not only did Boyle share his tips for successful story telling but he also highlighted what makes a good film and how to keep audiences engaged.

Celebrating all that Newham has to offer and showcasing the lives of the borough’s young population is behind Newham’s film entry to the first ever Sundance London Festival, taking place from Thursday 26 – Sunday 29 April 2012.

At just under five minutes long, the movie was the brainchild of Newham’s young mayor Abraham Male and is part of his visions to dispel stereotypes and discrimination surrounding young people, with the movie covering subject matters from young carers to young mums.

The film is based around the concept of 'time' and shines a light on what interests the borough’s youngsters and everything they get up to from the moment they wake up in the morning to the moment the sun goes down at night.

Shot in various locations, the movie showcases the borough’s famous landmarks, Thames Barrier Park, West Ham Football Club, London City Airport and includes backdrops such as the Olympic Park and Stadium. It will be entered into the short film competition category and also stars Newham’s Youth Councillors and youth employment trainees.

The film will be premiered at the Assemble Studio based within the world famous Three Mills Studio complex in April.

Abraham Male, Young Mayor of Newham said: “The Sundance film festival is a world famous event, and for the first time its taking place in London.

“We felt it was important to take part and produce a piece of work that the Newham’s young people and youth council can be proud of. It’s a wonderful opportunity to put our borough on the map and tell our story.”

The Sundance London short film competition will be judged by a panel of respected judges convened by Greenwich Council. They will select a shortlist of 25 nominated films to be considered for the final prize. A further panel, made up of Sundance institute staff and the directors of the films being shown at Sundance London, will then decide upon the winner, to premiere as part of the Sundance London film programme.

The festival will also feature a selection of the best films from the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, an exciting music line-up, and a series of panel discussions on the most pressing issues facing independent filmmakers on both sides of the pond.