Covid-19 in Newham

How to stay safe

Thank you for everything you are doing to help keep Newham safe. Together, we can help reduce the spread of COVID-19 and get back to living life as fully as we want to.

To keep yourself, your loved ones and communities safe, please follow this guidance:

Get vaccinated and top up with a booster

Vaccination remains our best line of defence against the pandemic. The vaccinations are free and available throughout Newham. You can book an appointment through the NHS, or you can come to a walk in clinic.

Full details of where to get a COVID-19 vaccination or booster in Newham are available on our website.

If you have COVID-19 symptoms

You should self-isolate and get tested as soon as possible by calling 119 or visiting the NHS website. The most important symptoms to look out for are:

  • A fever / high temperature
  • A new continuous cough (coughing for 1 hour, 3 coughing episodes in 24 hours)
  • A change or loss of taste or smell.

If you have these symptoms or test positive for COVID-19 you must:

Stay at home and self-isolate immediately.

  • Self-isolation can end after 7 days, following 2 negative LFD tests taken 24 hours apart on day 6 and day 7 of isolation.
  • You can not leave isolation until 48 hours after your fever ends. This still applies if you have been double vaccinated.

Note: It is the law to self-isolate. You could be fined if you do not self-isolate following a positive test result for COVID-19 and you are notified by NHS Test and Trace that you need to self-isolate. Find out more about fines on the government website.

Symptoms

Also look out for these additional symptoms – if in doubt, get tested:

  • Diarrhoea
  • Blocked / runny nose
  • Aching muscles
  • Long-lasting headache
  • Vomiting
  • Sore throat
  • Feeling tired and unwell

If you are in close contact with someone who has or tests positive for COVID-19

COVID-19 is highly infectious and you are still at risk of getting the virus. Please remember: hands, face, space, fresh air.

Follow the guidance below if you are in close contact with someone who has symptoms of or tests positive for COVID-19.

If you are not vaccinated:

  • You are legally required to self-isolate for 10 days (or until 48 hours after your fever ends, whichever is longer) and get tested. You can order a test by calling 119 or visiting the NHS website.
  • If you have been contacted by NHS Test & Trace and told to isolate, they will tell you how many days you need to isolate for.

Find out more about self-isolation on the Government's stay at home page.

You may be able to get financial and other support when isolating. Contact the COVID-19 Helpline on 020 7473 9711 or [email protected]

Note: It is the law to self-isolate. You could be fined if you do not self-isolate following a positive test result for COVID-19 and you are notified by NHS Test and Trace that you need to self-isolate. Find out more about fines on the government website.

Book your vaccine, or attend a walk-in clinic.

If you are double vaccinated (had two doses):

  • Double vaccinated adults who do not have any COVID-19 symptoms must do daily rapid (LFT) tests for 7 days.
  • Doubly vaccinated adults do not need isolate if LFT tests are negative but should avoid mixing with vulnerable people and going to crowded places

You are no longer legally required to self-isolate but to protect yourself and especially those who are vulnerable, you should be careful to follow: hands, face, space, fresh air. 

Note: You will need to wait until two weeks after your second dose to be eligible for these new rules, so the vaccine has time to build the maximum possible protection.

If you are under 18 years old:

  • Children (aged 5 to 18 years and 6 months) should take daily rapid (LFT) tests for 7 days if not isolating. Under 5s are exempt from isolation.
  • Under 18s do not need to isolate if LFT tests are negative but should avoid mixing with vulnerable people and going to crowded places

You are no longer legally required to self-isolate but to protect yourself and especially those who are vulnerable, you should be careful to follow: hands, face, space, fresh air. 

Close contact means:

  • Someone in your household who has symptoms of or has tested positive for COVID-19
  • The following types of contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19:
    • Face-to-face contact - including being coughed on or having a face-to-face conversation within one metre
    • Been less than one metre apart for one minute or longer without face-to-face contact
    • Been within 1-2 metres of someone for more than 15 minutes (either as a one-off contact, or added up together over one day)
    • Travelling in the same vehicle or plane

A contact is a person who has been close to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. You can be a contact any time from 2 days before the person who tested positive developed their symptoms (or, if they did not have any symptoms, from 2 days before the date their positive test was taken), and up to 10 days after, as this is when they can pass the infection on to others. 

Contacts of people with symptoms can stop isolating if the person with symptoms receives a negative PCR test.