Employment Rights Hub

The Employment Rights Hub is key to delivering on the Mayor’s community wealth building agenda to ensure that economic growth in Newham is shared locally. The Mayor is putting people at the heart of everything the Council does to ensure that residents have access to employment rights support and advice, whatever their circumstances.

You can access free confidential support from the new Employment Rights Hub if you are a Newham resident.

It is important to take action quickly, as in some circumstances you only have a certain amount of time to act.

If you are having a problem at work, the Employment Rights Hub is here for advice and support to help provide a solution.

Get in touch

Contact the Employment Rights Hub in confidence:
Tel. 020 3373 6494
Email: [email protected]

We’re open Monday to Friday 9am-5pm.

What are employment rights?

In the UK there are laws that protect you at work. These are called statutory employment rights and they mean that the person you work for must treat you fairly. If your employer does not treat you fairly, then they may be breaking the law.

Do I have any employment rights?

Everyone who works in the UK has employment rights. It does not matter where you come from or what job you do.

In employment law, a person’s employment status helps determine their rights and the employer’s responsibilities.

It is important to know what your employment status is and understand how it affects your rights.

The three main types of employment status are: 

  • Employee: most people who work regular hours for another person or a company are called employees. They have lots of employment rights.
  • Worker: most people who only work for another person or company when there is work available are called workers. They have some employment rights.
  • Self-employed: people who own their own company or business are self-employed. They do not have very many employment rights.

It can be very difficult to work out what your employment status is, but it is really important to know this so that you know what rights you have. We are on hand to help you.

You can find out more about employment status on the Trade Union Congress’s (TUC) website.

In addition to statutory rights, you may also have contractual rights. Details of these can be found in your employment contract. Please contact us for further advice on this.

  • Employee: most people who work regular hours for another person or a company are called employees. They have lots of employment rights.
  • Worker: most people who only work for another person or company when there is work available are called workers. They have some employment rights.
  • Self-employed: people who own their own company or business are self-employed. They do not have very many employment rights.

It can be very difficult to work out what your employment status is, but it is really important to know this so that you know what rights you have. We are on hand to help you.

You can find out more about employment status on the Trade Union Congress’s (TUC) website.

In addition to statutory rights, you may also have contractual rights. Details of these can be found in your employment contract. Please contact us for further advice on this.

Examples of the support which the Employment Rights Hub can offer

Rights when you lose your job 
We can provide support and advice on redundancy pay, unfair dismissal, notice periods and pay.

Coronavirus and employment rights
If you need to self-isolate and are concerned how this will affect your income and employment, we can help.

We can also help if your employer is not following government safety guidelines or if you have concerns about furlough.

Working hours and conditions
We can provide guidance about staying safe at work in all aspects, as well as having a healthy work-life balance, including your entitlement to rest breaks, health and safety, the right to request flexible working and working hours.

Taking time off work
We can help ensure that your employer gives a certain amount of time off; this includes sick leave and pay, holiday pay and time off for emergencies.

Being treated fairly and equally
We can help ensure that you are treated fairly and equally at work. As an employee, you are protected from discrimination and harassment.

Pay
Employment rights ensure that your employer pays you the right amount of money for the work which you do. We can help support and advise on: unlawful deductions from your salary; the National Minimum Wage; the London Living Wage and saving for your retirement.

Rights for families and parents
There are a number of rights that protect you when you or your partner have or adopt a child, including maternity leave and pay, paternity leave and pay, shared parental leave and pay, and adoption leave and pay.

Mental wellbeing
Struggling with a problem at work can take its toll on your mental health. You can find tools and resources to help your mental health and wellbeing on Thrive LDN.

Trade unions

Joining a trade union can be a great help towards dealing with a problem at work.  You can find the right union for you at www.tuc.org.uk/joinunion

The below examples represent a general overview of some actions that could be taken. This is not intended to be used as a self-help tool and we always recommend that you seek advice before you take any action. All information given on this page is for guidance only. The Employment Rights Hub does not provide an advocacy service or employment tribunal representation but we may be able to direct you to where you can find this support if needed. No responsibility can be accepted or liability undertaken by the London Borough of Newham or its employees or agents for any omissions in respect of information contained on this web page. 

Unfair dismissal

“I was dismissed from my job after I reported witnessing my manager committing a criminal offence at work”.

This is an example of unfair dismissal due to whistleblowing. As an employee you have the right to report or disclose an incident that is in the public interest, without facing consequences such as being dismissed. In this case, you should:

  1. Speak to your union representative if you are a member of a trade union.
  2. Speak to your HR department to get advice and information.
  3. Get advice from third parties such as Citizens Advice or an employment lawyer. 
  4. Raise a formal grievance in line with the company’s procedure and appeal via their appeals process.
  5. Get advice from the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS) in order to resolve the matter through early conciliation. 
  6. Make a claim to an employment tribunal. 

Employment rights abuse: failure to receive payslips

“I started a new job three months ago as a part time employee and I still haven’t received any payslips from my employer. I urgently need to submit them to the job centre for continued support with my housing benefit. What should I do?”

As a part time employee you are legally entitled to receive payslips for any work you complete.

You should approach your manager or payroll department informally and explain the problem. If this does not get you anywhere, speak to your union rep, as they may be able to intervene and help you resolve the dispute with your employer.

If this does not help, you should raise a formal grievance. We will work with you to create a grievance letter to submit to your employer, but first you should check your employer’s procedures.

Discrimination

“I’m a 52 year old black male and I have returned to work after self-isolating for two weeks. I have been selected for redundancy because my employer has decided to make all non-white male members of staff who are over 50 redundant. The employer’s reason for this is because Covid-19 has disproportionately impacted this group.”

This is direct discrimination, as your employer is under a legal duty to ensure that any decisions they make do not directly or indirectly discriminate against an employee with protected characteristics i.e. age, disability, gender reassignment, sex, religion or belief, sexual orientation, race, marriage and civil partnerships, and pregnancy and maternity.

  1. Speak to your union representative, if you have one.
  2. Raise your complaint informally with your line manager or HR department (if you have one).
  3. Check your employer’s complaints/grievance procedure.
  4. Request a formal appeal if the company has an appeals process. 
  5. Contact ACAS and try to resolve the dispute by early conciliation.
  6. As a last resort, you can make a claim to an Employment Tribunal; the deadline for this is three months less one day from the date on which your employment ended. Further information including time limits can be found on the ACAS website.