Our research

Research is important to how we plan, make decisions and ensure that the needs and voices of our residents are heard. It helps us to:

  • Understand what residents think and want on a range of issues
  • Make better decisions for our residents
  • Provide the best services possible
  • Develop policies to improve the lives of residents
  • Evaluate policies and services to make sure they are performing
  • Measure if we are meeting our commitments in the Corporate Plan.

This page gives an overview of the key pieces of research we have carried out. Each study is available to download. ​​

Employment Rights Service

In 2019, the council commissioned the Learning & Work Institute to conduct a community action research project to better understand how we can tackle employment rights abuse in the borough. Learning & Work Institute researched the nature and scale of employment rights abuse, and recommended what the council could do to prevent this.

Read the Employment Rights Service final report (PDF)

Tenants and Leaseholders Survey

We conduct an annual satisfaction survey with our council tenants and leaseholders.

Read the Newham Council Tenants and Leaseholders Surveys 2018 (PDF)

Newham Household Panel Survey (NHPS)

We carry out the Newham Household Panel Survey (NHPS) every two years. It is the only panel survey of its type in the country. NHPS helps us to understand our residents, their household circumstances, the issues they face and what they think about the services we offer.

Understanding Newham 2017: Findings from Wave 9 of the Newham Household Panel Survey (PDF)

Community resilience

This research by the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) and The Campaign Company was commissioned to help us understand the social networks and values of residents in Newham. 

We wanted to explore how the networks and values of our residents affect their lives, decisions and opportunities.

Community resilience in Newham (PDF)

Facing Debt: Economic resilience

This research explores the relationship between financial planning and skills, credit and debt and the impact of welfare reforms onNewham’s residents.

The research was conducted by the London School of Economic and highlights the struggle that both working and non-working households’ experience.

We used the research to develop MoneyWorks, an affordable and ethical alternative to high cost payday lenders.

Facing debt: Economic resilience in Newham (PDF)

The London School of Economics and Trust for London carried out a follow-up study in 2019:

Read Managing the Unmanageable: Debt and Economic Resilience in Newham on the LSE website