Domestic violence support

What can be defined as sexual violence?

There are lots of behaviours that you may not realise are sexual violence, they include: 

  • A completed non-consensual sex act, known as rape 

  • Attempted non-consensual sex act, known as attempted rape 

  • Abusive sexual contact, like unwanted touching  

  • Non-contact sexual abuse, such as threatened sexual violence, exhibitionism, verbal sexual harassment. 

Childhood sexual abuse is a form of sexual violence. 

There are no excuses for sexual violence 

You are not to blame – 100% of the blame for rape and sexual assault lies with the perpetrator. Sexual violence has nothing to do with the way you are dressed or being under the influence of drugs or alcohol.  Nobody has the right to have sex with you without your consent.  

Most victims are raped by someone they know. If you are in a relationship with someone or married and they force you to have sex, or do something sexual against your will, it is still rape or sexual assault.  

If you say, “yes” to sex or sexual contact because you feel under pressure or you are frightened of the consequences if you don’t, this doesn't mean that you have consented to sex.